Last edited by Kagabar
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

6 edition of Indoor radon and its hazards found in the catalog.

Indoor radon and its hazards

by David Bodansky

  • 123 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by University of Washington Press in Seattle .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radon -- Toxicology,
  • Indoor air pollution -- Health aspects,
  • Radon -- Environmental aspects,
  • Carcinogenesis,
  • Environmental Pollutants -- adverse effects,
  • Lung Neoplasms -- etiology,
  • Radon -- adverse effects

  • Edition Notes

    Statementeditors: David Bodansky, Maurice A. Robkin, David R. Stadler ; contributing authors: David Bodansky ... [et al.].
    ContributionsBodansky, David., Robkin, M. A., Stadler, David R., University of Washington. Environmental Radiation Studies Committee.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRA1247.R33 I53 1987
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 147 p. :
    Number of Pages147
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2387099M
    ISBN 100295965169, 0295965177
    LC Control Number87016134

    Radon can reside at dangerous levels inside homes, schools and other buildings. Exposure to radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, after smoking. Radon-related lung cancers are responsible for an estima deaths annually in the United States. 1. How Does Radon Enter a Home or Building? Radon forms naturally. The Indoor Radon Program, within the Environmental Management Branch, seeks to reduce the health risk from radon exposure by increasing awareness, identifying areas of high radon potential, and encouraging all Californians to test their homes for radon, fix their homes if they have a radon problem, and build new homes radon-resistant.

    Radon is another major current concern related to adverse effects associated with indoor pollution [48, 49]. Radon gas is derived from the radioactive decay of radium, an ubiquitous element found in rock and soil. Radon can easily diffuse through air and is soluble in water. It tends to accumulate in enclosed structures like mines and buildings. In recent years, the perception of indoor radon as a relatively minor health issue has been radically altered: observations in Sweden, Canada, and the U.S. have revealed the high incidence of elevated radon levels in ordinary houses and the extreme hazard of inhaling radon decay products. These findings have lead to a wide range of activities and intensive research aimed at limiting human.

    "Radon's Threat Can Be Subdued", part 1 - [PDF] William Turner, Terry Brennan, Solar Age Magazine Radon and its progeny are the slipperiest pollutants in the indoor environment, but there are simple ways to keep radon and its relations at bay. EPA updated the Agency’s estimates of lung cancer risks from indoor radon based on the National Academy of Sciences’ (NAS) latest report on radon, the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VI Report (). This report is the most comprehensive review of scientific data gathered on radon and builds on and updates the findings of.


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Indoor radon and its hazards by David Bodansky Download PDF EPUB FB2

@article{osti_, title = {Indoor radon and its hazards}, author = {Bodansky, D and Robkin, M A and Stadler, D R}, abstractNote = {This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Overview of the indoor radon problem; Terminology for describing radon concentrations and exposures.

About this Item: Editorial Universidad de Cantabria, Spain, Book. Condition: New. Language: English. Brand new Book.

The Radon Group from the University of Cantabria in Spain organized, in an old uranium mine site, a new inter-laboratory performance exercise to measure radon indoors exposure and external gamma radiation, with changing parameters of temperature, pressure and humidity.

The National Research Council published the report, entitled: "Health Effects of Exposure to Radon: BEIR VI, Committee on Health Risks of Exposure to Radon (BEIR VI)".

This report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is the most definitive accumulation of scientific data on indoor radon. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Revision of a report issued by the University of Washington's Environmental Radiation Studies.

@article{osti_, title = {Potential health effects of indoor radon exposure}, author = {Radford, E P}, abstractNote = {Radon is a ubiquitous noble gas arising from decay of radium normally present in the earth's crust. Alpha radiation from inhaled short-lived daughters of radon readily irradiates human bronchial epithelium, and there is now good evidence of excess risk of lung.

This chapter discusses current knowledge on health risks from radon, including both lung cancer and other potential health effects. It also gives estimates of radon concentrations in various countries and summarizes recent estimates of the burden of radon-induced lung cancer.

Radon is the largest natural source of human exposure to ionizing radiation in most countries. Indoor radon and its hazards / editors: David Bodansky, Maurice A. Robkin, David R. Stadler ; contributing authors: David Bodansky [et al.] University of Washington Press Seattle Wikipedia Citation.

The second largest cause of lung cancer is related to radon ( Rn) and its progenies in our environment. Building materials, such as concrete, contribute to the production of radon gas through the natural decay of U from its constituents.

This Radon has been recognized as one of the major contributor to the natural radiation and health hazards in the human dwellings. Radon is a radioactive gas you can't see, feel, taste, or smell. It starts out as uranium, a heavy metal found in the ground and most rocks on the planet.

When uranium decays, it turns into. National and international agencies operating under different directives have been responsible for addressing the health risk associated with indoor radon and for addressing its regulation.

This chapter provides a review and comparison of national and international guidelines and recommendations regarding radon in dwellings, schools, and workplaces.

It also examines the differences in the. More recently, radon has been recognized to be widespread in homes in the United States. An estima lung cancer deaths per year may be attributed to residential exposure to radon gas. In this statement the hazards of exposure to radon and its decay products, known as radon progeny or radon daughters, are reviewed.

@article{osti_, title = {Radon and its decay products in indoor air}, author = {Nero, Jr, A V}, abstractNote = {This book reviews the state of knowledge on radon in an attempt to point out the important aspects of the indoor radon problem. Topics of discussion include: pollution sources and transport processes; characteristics and behavior of radon; radiation hazards; and air pollution.

Radon then enters the indoor air from showers, clothes washing, dishwashing, and other uses of water. Figure shows typical entry points of radon.

Health risks of radon stem from its breakdown into “radon daughters,” which emit high-energy alpha particles. Radon and Its Decay Products in Indoor Air: An Overview (A. Nero, Jr.). SOURCES AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES. Soil as a Source of Indoor Radon: Generation, Migration, and Entry (W.

Nazaroff, et al.). Building Materials as a Source of Indoor Radon (E. Stranden). Radon Entry Via Potable Water (W. Nazaroff, et al.).

In recent years, the perception of indoor radon as a relatively minor health issue has been radically altered: observations in Sweden, Canada, and the U.S. have revealed the high incidence of elevated radon levels in ordinary houses and the extreme hazard of inhaling radon decay products.

@article{osti_, title = {Radon and its decay products in indoor air}, author = {Nazaroff, W W and Nero, A V}, abstractNote = {This book provides an analysis of the radon problem. Papers reflecting the most current research review major aspects of this issue.

Coverage includes the generation and migration of radon in source material, the physical and chemical behavior of radon, current. Radon (/ ˈ r eɪ d ɒ n /) is a radioactive, colorless, odorless, tasteless noble gas, occurring naturally as the decay product of is one of the densest substances that remains a gas under normal conditions, and is considered to be a health hazard due to its radioactivity.

The National Institute of Health (NIH, presently the Center for Disease Control and Prevention) investigated indoor radon concentrations in Seoul and the Northern Gyeonggi-do Province from to in order to obtain basic data with which to assess the potential hazard associated with radon and its decay products [27–29].

In the first. Radon (Rn) The most common source of indoor radon is uranium in the soil or rock on which homes are built. As uranium naturally breaks down, it releases radon gas which is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas.

Radon gas enters homes through dirt floors, cracks in. CDC’s Radon Communication Toolkit is designed for environmental and public health professionals to use to increase awareness and understanding of radon, its health effects, and the importance of testing for radon among the communities they serve.

The toolkit contains customizable fact sheets, infographics, newsletter articles, and social media posts. This book explains the mechanism for generation and accumulation of radon, describes methods for measuring and reducing its concentration, and examines critically the basis for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) estimate that as many as 20 lung cancers per year can be attributed to this naturally occurring substance.Indoor Radon Program.

The primary goal of the Utah Division of Waste Management and Radiation Control’s (DWMRC) Indoor Radon Program is to reduce the level of indoor radon in the state of Utah to concentrations less than the Environmental Protection Agency’s action level of 4 pCi/L (pico-Curies per liter).The Radon program is partially funded by the State Indoor Radon Grant from the EPA.

Health Effects of Radon High radon exposure is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Radon is a noble gas (reactive compound), and is quickly exhaled after being breathed in. Radon progeny (decayed products) combined with other air molecules, such as dust particles and smoke, can be deposited in the airway of the lungs and become.