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Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington found in the catalog.

Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington

Charles E. Price

Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington

by Charles E. Price

  • 287 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Artificial groundwater recharge -- Washington (State) -- Walla Walla Region.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Charles E. Price ; prepared in cooperation with the state of Washington Department of Conservation.
    SeriesGeological Survey water-supply paper -- 1594-A, Artificial recharge of ground water
    ContributionsWashington (State). Dept. of Conservation.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 33 p. :
    Number of Pages33
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22968095M

    The first topic includes the feasibility study of artificial aquifer recharge in the Walla Walla Basin. Through development and application of a regional hydrological model, a methodology for evaluating locations of artificial aquifer recharge is presented with a test case. The second research topic evaluates the recharge rates observed from. Oregon Aquifer Recharge Report. Oregon Aquifer Recharge Report. On-Farm Aquifer Storage & Recovery /Artificial Recharge & Recovery Report (with appendices - 14 MB) City of Milton-Freewater Aquifer Storage & Recovery Project Report (27mb) Drawings (12mb) Tech Specifications (1mb) Oregon Managed Aquifer Recharge Report.

      (a) Injection Well The injection wells are similar to a tube well. This technique is suitable for augmenting the ground water storage of deeper aquifers by “pumping in” treated surface water. These wells can be used as pumping wells during summers. The method is suitable to recharge single aquifer or multiple aquifers. The recharge through. quality of water from the deep basalt aquifer. The city currently has a cubic-feet-per-second (cfs) ( m3/sec) water right on Mill Creek, and is developing a winter water right for an additional 20 cfs ( m3/sec) for artificial recharge of the basalt aquifer to ensure a plentiful municipal water supply in .

    WSP E / Foxworthy, B. L. and Bryant, C. T. / ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE THROUGH A WELL TAPPING BASALT AQUIFERS AT THE DALLES, OREGON, , pb, 55 pages, 1 plate (in pocket), 7 figs., 5 tables, $ 16 WSP F / Foxworthy, B. L. / HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AND ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE THROUGH A WELL IN THE SALEM HEIGHTS AREA OF SALEM, OREGON, , . One result of the growing competition for water is increased attention to the use of artificial recharge to augment ground water supplies. Stated simply, artificial recharge is a process by which excess surface water is directed into the ground—either by spreading on the surface, by using recharge wells, or by altering natural conditions to increase infiltration—to replenish an aquifer.


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Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington by Charles E. Price Download PDF EPUB FB2

ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE OF GROUND WATER ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE THROUGH A WELL TAPPING BASALT AQUIFERS, WALLA WALLA AREA, WASHINGTON By CHARLES E. PRICE ABSTRACT Declining water levels in part of the Columbia lava plateau, owing to pumping, have caused concern for several years.

Therefore, the U.S. Geological SurveyAuthor: Charles E. Price, D.W. Hubbell. Buy Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington (Geological Survey water-supply paper) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders.

Buy Artificial recharge of a well tapping basalt aquifers, Walla Walla area, Washington on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders. Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington Water Supply Paper A By: Charles E.

Price and D.W. Hubbell. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Price, Charles E., Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington. Artificial recharge of a well tapping basalt aquifers, Walla Walla area, Washington.

Water Supply Bulletin 7 () describes the results of a study to determine the feasibility of artificially recharging deep basalt aquifers in Walla Walla by injecting surface water from Mill Creek into a City of Walla Walla public-supply well.

ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE THROUGH A WELL TAPPING BASALT AQUIFERS AT THE DALLES, OREGON By B. FOXWORTHY and C. BRYANT ABSTKACT In the Dalles area, Oregon, an increase in pumpage from wells that tap per­ meable basalt aquifers has caused serious year-to-year declines in ground-water by: 4.

Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington() The Publications Warehouse does not have links to digital versions of this publication at this time Download citation as: RIS | Dublin Core.

Aquifer storage and recovery in a compartmentalized basalt aquifer system, Walla Walla, Washington. In P. Fox (Ed.), Management of aquifer recharge for sustainability. Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Managed Aquifer Recharge of Groundwater (pp.

Author(s) Water Resources Program: Description: Digital simulation of a basalt aquifer system, Walla Walla River Basin, Washington and Oregon. Water Supply Bulletin 44 () describes an investigation to determine the water budget for the entire Walla Walla River basin (including those parts of the basin in the state of Oregon) and develop a digital model to simulate the intermediate basalt.

Additional Physical Format: Print version: Price, Charles E., Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers Walla Walla area, Washington. The Walla Walla Basin Aquifer Recharge Program involves projects in both Oregon and Washington. Currently the programs has 18 constructed sites and funding for 2 additional sites.

14 of these projects are on the Oregon side of the border and 4 on the Washington side. The Walla Walla Basin is shared by the states of Oregon and Washington. The model area is km2 (90 mi2) Continental climate: Cold winters, hot summers.

Precipitation 25 to 38 cm/year Oct-May. Elev: m to m. Walla Walla Watershed. Pink delineation of new model area, black delineation of previous model area Petrides ().

guide on artificial recharge to ground water contents page no. introduction 1 - 3 2. planning of artificial recharge projects 3 - 9 3. artificial recharge techniques and design 10 - 32 4. monitoring, mechanism for artificial recharge 33 - 36 projects 5.

case histories of artificial recharge in india 36 - 75File Size: KB. Washington The Walla Walla, Wash., experi-ment7 was performed by USGS in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Conservation. The purpose of the experiment was to de-termine the feasibility of artificial re-charge to halt the decline in water levels in part of the Walla Walla Basin.

A well tapping the basalt aquifers of the Walla. This paper describes the main artificial recharge experiences made up to date by the Spanish geological survey (IGME) in detritical aquifers.

In some of these tests, infiltration plants have been. CHAPTER - IX ARTIFICIAL GROUND WATER RECHARGE WHY ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE Average annual water resources in our river basins are estimated as 1, billion cubic metres (BCM) of which utilizable resources are of the order of 1, BCM.

Out of this, BCM is available as surface water and the remaining BCM as ground water. The sourceFile Size: KB. The necessity of artificial recharge of aquifers is increasing day by day due to excessive demand of water by the ever-growing population and also because of the scarcity of good dam sites available for construction.

Artificial recharge of aquifer is the process of adding water to an aquifer through human effort. The main purpose of. Price, C.E.,Artificial recharge of a well tapping basalt aquifers, Walla Walla area, Washington: Washington Division of Water Resources, Water-Supply Bulletin 7, 50 p.

Artificial recharge of aquifers. The use of artificial recharge to store surplus surface water underground can be expected to increase as growing populations demand more water, and as the number of good dam sites still available for construction becomes fewer.

For example, artificial recharge may be used to store treated sewage effluent and. Artificial recharge of basalt aquifers in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho has received additional USGS attention since the s.

Price, C. E.,Artificial recharge through a well tapping basalt aquifers, Walla Walla area, Washington: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper A, 33 p. Prill, R.C., and Aaronson, D.B.,Ponding.Artificial Recharge of Groundwater: Hydrogeology and Engineering 61 Artificial Recharge: A Technology for Sustainable Water Resource Development 62 Artificial Groundwater Recharge 63 Guide on Artificial Recharge to Ground Water 63 Issue-based artificial recharge File Size: 5MB.Foxworthy, B.L.,Hydrologic conditions and artificial recharge through a well in the Salem Heights area of Salem, Oregon: U.S.

Geological Survey Water- Supply Paper F, 56 p. Garza, Serge,Artificial recharge for subsidence abatement at the NASA- Johnson Space Center, Phase I: U.

S. Geological Survey Open-File Report82 p.